Are all the English prepositions really necessary?

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The PHD who taught me calculus once dryly stated “Arguably all prepositions roughly mean the same thing!” So Roy McCasland, if you manage to read this, you should learn Tagalog(Filipino) which resoundingly supports your claim. Tagalog has two prepositions contrasted with the over 100 that are cumbersomely and onerously practiced in English. What is a preposition? Preposition literally means to place before. In this case, the word means to place before a noun. Some refer to prepositions as noun markers.

Nasa and sa which translate to on and in respectively in English are the only two prepositions in Tagalog! Could it be that the Philippine islanders who prefer the simple life and value nature also understand the value of a simple exception free language?

The most common reply to a phone call where the receiver was asleep is “I am in bed” NOT the correct “I am on the bed.” This amplifies the absurdity of a language that tries to distinguish between over 100 prepositions! English users can not even keep track of the difference between in and on!

BTW Dr. McCasland, you taught an excellent calculus class. Go Texas Tech! This writer is a math teacher and attempts to teach in a manner comparable to your pedagogy and style.
I will close by listing the over 100 English prepositions, for emphasis, that are pedantically and unnecessarily covered in many United States Schools:

aboard
about
above
across
after
against
along
amid
among
anti
around
as
at
before
behind
below
beneath
beside
besides
between
beyond
but
by
concerning
considering
despite
down
during
except
excepting
excluding
following
for

from
in
inside
into
like
minus
near
of
off
on
onto
opposite
outside
over
past
per
plus
regarding
round
save
since
than
through
to
toward
towards
under
underneath
unlike
until
up
upon
versus
via
with
within
without

 

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1 comment on “Are all the English prepositions really necessary?Add yours →

  1. I took an electrical engineering course from Darrell Vines at Texas Tech in Lubbock. I was quite amused to find a paper written by him on instructional feedback.

    Vines states “Clearly, the obvious items of the syllabus, course objectives, texts, laboratories, and prepared faculty member are assumed to be in place” in his paper.

    Dr. Vines was far from being prepared for the course on transistors he was supposed to be teaching. He did not go to the trouble to make different tests each semester and the people who made an A in his class were the dishonest ones who just memorized exams from semesters past because Darrell Vines was too lazy to make up another test. He relied far too heavily on student aids and did not come close to performing his duties as an instructor.

    Vines was obviously unprepared for this EE class, but still weeded out aspiring electrical engineering students! An unqualified gate keeper to say the very least.

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