The Tale of Two Pins

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The Tale of Two Cites by Charles Dickens has been nauseatingly copied in a countless set of contexts. I guess it is the alliteration of Ts that attracts writers to the title. So I now will fall into the predictable trap of using it in a chess milieu. I am sure the tale of two pins has been used by other chess writers, but it came to me after watching this game at ICC where White ruthlessly exploits two absolute pins on the Black King. Perhaps the late Larry Englebretson would appreciate this title. Larry, an exceptional singer and chess player, reveled in moments of levity as a chess teacher and chess players in Houston miss this affable genius.

Black has just played Qd6 and appears to be protecting everything and surviving. The second player’s e7 Knight and c6 Bishop are absolutely pinned to the Black Monarch. Also the b8 Knight is fatally undeveloped. Contrastingly, the White forces are optimally deployed and the King is snug as a bug in the rug. Alliteration and rhyming all in the same chess article. Wow!

See if you can find the move that forces black to tip over his King. Scroll down underneath diagram for the winning tactic that decides this chess game.

The tale of Two Pins
The tale of Two Pins

Knight captures pawn at d5 or Nxd5

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