A book subtitled A Glimpse into the Mystery of Suffering

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We picked up a copy of  The Story of Job at an Estate sale in either Hobbs, Carlsbad, Roswell, or Artesia, New Mexico. The book was written in 1902 by Jessie Penn-Lewis. The subtitle of the slender tome is A Glimpse into the Mystery of Suffering.

I was moved by the hand written note on the front page of the book: You have been a joy and a blessing to all of us, especially me. My love and prayers are with you. Keep growing in your love for our Lord, and in the richness of his Truth. God Bless you!

The short love-filled note was signed either Gay or Gary. The note was written in red ink which could indicate the writer was a teacher or lived with a teacher.

The author of the book characterized it as a treasure-store ever since she went through it with her Bible class in 1895. I believe Jessie was a female. Forgive me if I am mistaken. The author did a great job of explaining why God allows the furnace of affliction to be part of the experience of human kind.  Jehovah was used in lieu of God throughout the book and the Devil/Satan was often referred to as the adversary.

I learned that Gabriel means God’s Hero and that Michael means who is like unto God. Gabriel foretold the birth of Christ. Michael’s job was to thwart the efforts of anyone trying to impersonate or misrepresent God.

We purchased the book for 50 cents and it was definitely worth writing about. You should drop in on an Estate sale. You will possibly get precious insights into a families core values that you would likely never find in a library.

The Story of Job purchased at Estate Stale
The Story of Job purchased at Estate Stale
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1 comment on “A book subtitled A Glimpse into the Mystery of SufferingAdd yours →

  1. Melissa Kirk, a psychology major/webmaster, does a great job of covering rumination as it relates to suffering and not just spiritual suffering. She astutely covers the mood changing effects of excessive rumination. Ms. Kirk also mentions that we often ruminate on problems that have no solution. Now that is food for thought. Move on if you can NOT do anything about it!

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